Brexit: Jamaica’s cue to Exit (CARICOM)

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Photo credits: Atlanta Black Star

So Britain decided to exit the EU and all hell literally broke loose; will Jamaica follow suit and hightail it out of CARICOM? For all intents and purposes, CARICOM was designed to “…improve standards of living and work; the full employment of labor and other factors of production.” Additionally, according to Coalition for the International Criminal Court, CARICOM was designed to facilitate “…accelerated, coordinated and sustained economic development and convergence; expansion of trade and economic relations with third States; enhanced levels of international competitiveness…” to name a few. However, this has not quite been the case in recent years.

Jamaica vs. the Rest

Brexit

Photo Credit: www.one-europe.info

My little island has a wealth of resources, ranging from creative geniuses (music, poetry, crafts) to tourism. Additionally, we have agricultural and mineral resources that make us the envy of many developed countries. But, what I find astonishing is that some of our regional neighbours have been unrelenting in their efforts to stifle our economy. We have seen examples of tyranny by Trinidad and Tobago, and Barbados, towards Jamaicans in particular. Now, this is not from an individual level, but from a systematic, bureaucratic level, where the governments of the countries involved could work towards fixing some of these issues. More recently, Antigua and Barbuda has joined on the band wagon to make business difficult for budding Jamaican entrepreneurs.

Amicable Solution

Jamaica has been substantially independent over the years, but in a sense that it has relied very little on it’s regional neighbours. Moreover, Jamaica receives more aid from China than it does from its own backyard (insert *eye emoji*). I kid you not! Our regional neighbours are typically unfazed by regional crises and look out mainly for themselves. Therefore, what is the purpose of CARICOM if members are not held accountable for breaking laws of the treaty and continuously do so?

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Photo credit: Pinterest

We should perhaps graciously leave and continue to focus on our agenda of economic development and continue to compete aggressively. We have seen way too many infractions on the part of our regional counterparts that go unresolved. Our aim should be to define ourselves as a unique treasure in the Caribbean which Includes:

 

  1. The richest Caribbean culture known worldwide
  2. The most sought-after human resources from the Caribbean
  3. The highest number of female managers/leaders per capita
  4. Some of the most talented individuals
  5. Marijuana (one of the fastest growing industries in the world)

Consequently, Jamaica, I would encourage us as a people to work towards seeing the pros and cons of being a member of CARICOM. Additionally, consider the value of being in this community as it relates to support and overall economic and regional involvement. ~JGIC


Jodi-Ann is a Master of Arts in Geography candidate in Nova Scotia who enjoys helping international students and represents her native island, Jamaica, every opportunity she gets. An educator at heart, she enjoys taking each opportunity to offer advice and answer questions about school, life and work. If you want to get to know her, walk with your pet cat, one of Jodi’s published books, and chocolate – the good kind!

 

Things Jamaicans Learn (Quickly): Moving to Farrin

There a few things Jamaicans learn when they move to Farrin, and I can guarantee these are probably the most important. When Jamaicans are at home, the “No Problem, Man!” ideal can be taken a bit out of context; especially when you have family members and close friends living overseas. It’s all fun and games until the recipients move overseas and get a taste of life overseas for themselves. They learn rather quickly that foreign life is not “a bed a roses.”

5. No, I can’t leave farrin yet.

It’s the worst thing when the holidays come around and you want to go home to partake in that pot roast beef, sorrel, and Christmas cake. But ya got bills, so you gotta stay and shovel snow to get to work.

Video courtesy of: Imgur

4. That thing is actually expensive

So you wanted a phone when you were in Jamaica, or a watch, or… But then you moved overseas and after working in a capitalistic society, you found out that the price tag of USD/CAD/£$150 actually took you 3 months to save, and you probably would rather keep your money any way.

Courtesy of giphy.com

Courtesy of giphy.com

3. You can’t ask your neighbour for sugar

As a Jamaican living in Jamaica, it was always cool to run to Maizie, or ask Novelette or Nicky to loan you a pepper, or beg a lime off her tree. You could go as far as climb the mango tree and nourish yourself with the neighbour’s permission. After moving to farrin though, you don’t even get a chance to sit and chat with your neighbour. Sometimes, you may get to say “Hi” and have a brief convo, but rarely to the extent at which you get to do it back home.

Pic Courtesy of pinterest.com

Pic Courtesy of pinterest.com

2. You found out Jamaican food is the best thing you’ll ever eat

The big move came and you couldn’t wait to sink your teeth into pizza, fries, and all the other things designed to give you high cholesterol, diabetes, and other types of heart disease. But after living a farrin for about 2 weeks, the excitement wore off and you start craving a tin a mackerel, some bully beef, jerk chicken, good ole oxtail and a nice, hot patty and coco bread.

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 1. Money nuh grow pon tree!!

This is by far the most important thing my counterparts have learned upon moving overseas. Paying your bills is paramount and you literally celebrate when you have money left over! It speaks for itself! ~JGIC

Pic Courtesy of brainybudget.com

What’s missing from this list? Comment below and share this post!


Jodi-Ann is a Master of Arts in Geography candidate in Nova Scotia who enjoys helping international students and represents her native island, Jamaica, every opportunity she gets. An educator at heart, she enjoys taking each opportunity to offer advice and answer questions about school, life and work. If you want to get to know her, walk with your pet cat, one of Jodi’s published books, and chocolate – the good kind!

Happy Father’s Day – A Dedication

Happy Father’s Day; photo from www.happyfathersday.com

Father’s Day is never “Happy Father’s Day” in the traditional sense to me. For some, it is a celebration of the adult male figure who is either the biological or adopted father of his children. For others, it is a painful reminder that some men will just never be qualified to take on that role. For me, it is bittersweet – a mixture of both.

I’ll explain:

The worst thing for any little girl is growing up with the physical presence of a father who was never emotionally, spiritually, and psychologically there to guide her in growing up. But we’re not here to dwell on that today. We’re here to think about and celebrate the men who have stepped in to fulfill this honorable role.

I would like to say that, for my life, the biological idea of a “father” figure was missing. But I had three wonderful male figures who played an integral role in assisting me with making good decisions and supporting my efforts. Sometimes we limit our idea of fatherhood until we forget to highlight and recognize other men in our lives who contributed to making us who we are.

My Brother

Growing up, we had very few resources; however, with a brother like mBroskiine, you’d never know that this reality existed. My brother broke his bread, cut his meat, and offered me his pencils when the need arose. As an adult, I can safely say he does the same thing. He will still offer me half (after begging him for hours) of whatever he has and certainly still spoils me. I deserve it, though – I am the baby. It never dawned on me that having this kind of relationship was so important. Furthermore, as I watch my daughter bonding with my brother and getting her technical questions answered, I realize that something was indeed missing from my life.

Superhero and Superdad

Our men are vital, and as people who are in their lives, we should make a concerted effort to ensure that they are appreciated. My brother not only serves his family, but this Father’s Day, he is out serving his country. To my brother, wherever you are in the world today, Happy Father’s Day. I love you and certainly owe you for what you continue to do for me, even at this stage of our lives.

My Uncles

I am grateful to have great men in my life and I have two wonderful uncles who are always there for me. Wherever they go in the world, no matter the time of day, my uncles always respond. They give support, offer advice and guidance, and listen to me when I have a problem. Most importantly, they allow me to cry on their old shoulders (Yes, I’m speaking to you, Uncle D!). I managed to maintain a close relationship with these gentlemen throughout my life and use them as examples of what children would like to see in a father.

To my awesome uncles, who never fail to be there for me: Happy Father’s Day to you!

All our deserving men

For all our Fathers out there, biological, adopted, or in whatever capacity you serve as a positive male role model, I’d like to take this time out to wish you all a Happy Father’s Day!

Much love! ~JGIC


Jodi-Ann is a Master of Arts in Geography candidate in Nova Scotia who enjoys helping international students and represents her native island, Jamaica, every opportunity she gets. An educator at heart, she enjoys taking each opportunity to offer advice and answer questions about school, life and work. If you want to get to know her, walk with your pet cat, one of Jodi’s published books, and chocolate – the good kind!